This is surely a brilliant way to get anyone involved in STEM

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Forensics 

Anyone who has spent holiday hours deeply engrossed in a Arthur Conan Doyle detective mystery and wished they were the one solving the crime, will be thrilled to find out that they can now realise their secret fantasy to be Sherlock Holmes.

CASE Academy: The school for CSIs and special agents is a project by London-based startup Forensic Outreach, currently on Kickstarter to raise funds to start a virtual faculty that aims to get kids interested in the science behind crime scene investigation. The curriculum is suitable for science educators teaching STEM subjects to students between ages 11 and 18. However, TV series like NCIS, Bones, Dexter and CSI have sparked an unprecedented public interest in forensic science that startup foresees a wide range of students for their online learning platform, including students who can’t see the connection between school subjects like biology, chemistry and physics and the real world.

The CASE Academy will be an interactive virtual learning platform for forensic, crime and security science. The planned syllabus has of six core modules: crime scene investigation, forensic anthropology; forensic pathology, forensic toxicology, ballistics and forensic and criminal psychology. Students will learn through lectures, simulations and games. Teachers will be able to download the curriculum for ages 11 to 13, 14 to 16 and 17 to 18 year-old students.

Forensic Outreach aims to raise at least $150,000 but have plans to extend the curriculum to include two additional modules on cybersecurity and counterterrorism should the Kickstarter campaign reach $500K.

The lecturers include some of the most renowned investigators and forensic scientists in the world with many years of experience working at the US Department of Defence, the FBI, the Home Office Police and Crime Directorates Office and professors in forensic anthropology, toxicology as well as an FBI examiner and cryptanalyst.

Forensic Outreach has been delivering workshops to schools, institutions of higher education and charities for 13 years and now plans to reach a wider audience with three aims in mind, namely to: • inspire interest in forensic, crime and security science • galvanize STEM learning inside and outside the classroom • enhance public understanding of the science used in criminal justice